Krabi, Koh Lanta and PhiPhi- A final bit of Island hopping

It seems like ages ago that we were on mainland Thailand. After about ten days in total on Koh Tao we had to head back to the mainland to cross to the western Islands. Loads of people who’ve previously ventured to Thailand recommended the Krabi province as a must visit destination. We’d already eyed up a couple of spots we really wanted to visit and had some mates in a similar area, so decided to head to a coastal town called Ao Nang. 

Ao Nang

Imagine Blackpool in Thailand, with less coin machines and no jetty. Ao nang was a real tourist spot, and to be honest I’m not 100% sure why. Ao nang was far from the beauty of other parts of Thailand we’d seen, and totally strewn with shops selling knock off clothing and electronics, average restaurants either selling overpriced local food or feeble attempts at foreign cuisine. You can always tell a tourist spot when the menus are in 5 languages. This was clearly a spot for baby booming brits to come and drink cheap booze and burn, and by the looks of it, half of Russia too! 

We seemed to bring the bad weather with us; our mates who’d been in ao nang for a couple of days had no rain at all: the day we arrived it hacked it down! This basically meant we spent the first night sat in a pub for a few hours with Tim and Steph (quickly becoming our go to travel couple to link up with), followed by a few more bars and a copious amount of beer. This seems to be a trend with these two… 

There’s not a great deal to say about ao nang sadly; we used it more as a port to hop to other wonderful places. On one day however, the four of us went on a trek to Hang Nak, a famous spot known for some pretty stunning sights. After a tough 2 hour trek up some interesting terrain we made it to the summit, and wow, it was so worth it. You could see miles and miles of glorious landscapes, see for yourself!! I could have spent hours here just soaking in the views, but would have been very burned for sure (it was a seriously toasty day)! After 4 hours, about 2000ft elevation we were back on the bikes exploring the surrounding areas. It goes without saying, if you’re in Ao Nang, get out and explore rather than sitting on the beach or sitting in bars! 

One of the main reasons we stayed here was to get to Railey, an area actually on the mainland but only accessible by boat known for its stunning beaches and chilled atmosphere, but more importantly for me, CLIMBING!! We actually ended up spending a couple of days on separate occasions here because it was so nice, one day being beach bums and another scaling rocks. Railay is known for Phranang beach, more than anything for its limestone rock formations jutting out of the sea. Oh, and it’s cave filled with penis statues!! Sadly the day we were exploring this area we were hammered by some long lasting rain clouds. We obviously got drenched but our photos were a bit dull too. 

Sadly because of Kelly’s wrist following a car accident she had to skip the morning of climbing. I booked a morning with real rocks climbing school who I’d definitely recommend. They provided all the kit as you’d expect but the quality of the instructors was exceptional! We spent 4 hours on the rocks, scaling everything up to 50m walls. Sadly, my climbing skills aren’t quite up to that, so I didn’t manage to scale anything near that height, but had a great day trying real walls. This is definitely something I’d have another go at! A word of warning for others thinking of rock climbing, it is NOT the same as an indoor wall, but much harder!!

Koh Lanta

For Tim’s birthday, he decided he fancied Koh Lanta, a larger island on the south west coast. Koh Lanta is known for its super chilled atmosphere which sounded perfect and for what we all fancied after a couple of days with crap weather. After a 4 hour journey in a very cramped bus, we finally arrived at Pitt Bungalows, our home for the next few days. If you ever go to Koh Lanta I really rate this place. You get a private bamboo bungalow with a private bathroom, fridge and wifi, but also you get a scooter included too! The restaurant on site is also very good and very well priced, and you’re right next to the western beach. For us it was absolutely perfect, and even better at £12 a night! Tim and Steph ended up staying over a week longer than us it was that good! 

Koh Lanta was never intended to be a time for doing loads; we planned to have a relaxing time on the island. For Tim’s birthday we spent the whole day cooking ourselves on the beach, enjoying the beautiful 30c water and good company. We ended the night with a campfire on the beach, playing guitar and having a good ol’ sing song. Sadly the next day, Tim got ill/nasty hangover so we did literally nothing, which was great! The following few days consisted of touring the island exploring the various beaches and sights around the island, including an animal sanctuary, where we wanted to adopt all the dogs obviously, and a trip to the national park where we got plenty of enjoyment out of a monkey stealing Coke from a Chinese lady. We ended up staying on Koh Lanta for 6 days in the end. The company obviously helped a lot, but the island itself was just so relaxing and laid back. I’d definitely head back there in a heartbeat! 

Our time in Thailand was quickly coming to an end though, with only a couple of days left. We had one more “must see stop” to squeeze in though. 

Koh PhiPhi 

Phiphi is actually two tiny islands in between mainland and Phuket. It was nearly wiped out after the 2008 Asian tsunami, and apparently everything we saw there was newly built since then. Leg island was really made famous by “The Beach” movie from the late 90’s, even though maya bay (the famous scene) actually had limestone rocks superimposed in for the famous scene (fun fact there for you)! 

Every summer literally tens of thousands of people flock to this island just to get a snap on that beach. I genuinely have no idea why people go to so much effort! The islands longboat drivers charge an in-exorbitant amount for a short boat ride, as do the tours! Kelly really wanted to see it, but everything I’d read suggested unless you paid about £50 for a private boat and set off at 6am, or spent over £100 to stay on a boat overnight, you’d be sharing the beach with thousands of people all huddled like penguins on an iceberg; I didn’t fancy that! Instead we looked for alternative ways to see it. 

We opted for a day out snorkelling. As I can’t dive I’ve never been able to experience anything like diving, and PhiPhi is renowned for having some incredible sealife and crystal clear waters. They weren’t lying that’s for sure! We spent a whole day out on a longboat with some awesome people, exploring various coves and areas of PhiPhi Leh (where that beach is). We saw so much sea life, was more than we could have hoped for! I was fortunate enough to snorkel alongside a sea turtle, as well as baby black tip reef sharks, kelly spotted a whole pack of black tips just as we were finishing up, and things like lion fish, oh and of course, Nemo! The coral there is like nothing I’ve ever seen before too (sadly lots by the coast at Koh Tao was dead). We couldn’t have asked for a better day out, it was literally everything we hoped for. And we got to see the anticlimactic maya bay (so glad we didn’t endure the ballache of a boat tour for that). Seriously, if you want to see maya bay, but don’t want to be surrounded by thousands of others do what we did! Thanks again PhiPhi adventures for an unforgettable trip. After two days on phiphi we headed to our final destination, Phuket. Everyone we have spoken to said Phuket was a place to be avoided, so we agreed to spend as little time as possible there. Unfortunately, for the first time in all of south east Asia, kelly and I both got ill from something we ate on phiphi. Feeling sorry for ourselves we decided to splash out on a PROPER hotel, the first time we’ve done this since setting off over four months ago. By splashing out, I mean spending £20 on a room with Ac and a hot shower, not exactly 5* luxury!  

So now we’re in New Zealand! Reflecting on our time in Asia has been really satisfying to be honest. We had the most awesome time overall! For both of us, Vietnam was our favourite country for sure; it’s just so chilled out, the food is SO GOOD, and the whole experience was simply wonderful. However Thailand was a close second. It’s a real shame we had such bad weather for south Thailand (unprecedented for this time of the year). I’ll definitely be heading back again though, thats for sure! 

Asia, you’ve been great, but it’s time for some western living. I’ve wanted to visit New Zealand all my life, so I’m VERY excited about the next five weeks exploring it in a camper van! 

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Koh Tao- Into the flood

We’ve both been absolutely gagging for some beach bum vibes for a sustained period of time, and where better to achieve this than on Thailand’s picturesque south islands! Our first island experience began with Koh Tao, an island known primarily for its diving (especially for learning to dive), but also for being generally awesome. We were both so excited to be leaving crazy cities like Bangkok and living the chilled island life for a month. Sadly, the start of island life didn’t quite go to plan..
We’ve been really quite lucky over the past 100 or so days with weather. Yes, we’ve had a couple of overcast days (sometimes a blessing in disguise), and been caught in a couple of showers, but nothing I’d classify as severe or that requires a drastic change in our plans or routes. However, throughout our whole journey we’ve heard so many stories about freak weather in different countries. In Varanasi for example, the Ganges flooded higher than they ever have before, resulting in the Ganga Artii ceremony being held on a nearby roof for the first time ever, and in Phong Nha, the whole town was under water just days before we arrived. On this trip, I’ve really started to gain a much greater appreciation for climate and its volatility. In England, when 3mm of snow falls, everything goes to shit. On the other side of the world, when weather is bad, it gets REALLY bad!, and everyone just gets on with it. This storm though was an unrelenting monster!

We arrived on Koh Tao on the bumpiest and most vomit inducing boat trip I’ve ever experienced (we later found out the boat we were on is nicknamed the vomit comet by locals, as 60% of passengers spend the majority of the journey spewing constantly regardless of the waves). We have basically taken to ignoring weather forecasts in south east Asia as they have pretty much said rain would occur every day, even when there’s not a cloud in the sky. For this reason, we weren’t phased by the reports of a week of rain.Unbeknownst to us though, we had arrived on this beautiful island in the middle of the sea at the start of a freak storm that lasted days. I’ve seen reports from some sources that suggest it was actually a typhoon, and others suggesting it was the tail end of a monster storm that initially hit China. Either way, it was the worst storm to hit Koh Tao for over thirty years according to locals, and totally freak for this time of the year. The whole of Thailand was clobbered by this storm, but we were in the heart of it. Koh Tao, Phagnan and Samui were all in the centre and were the worst hit; apparently Samui even worse than us! I’ve genuinely never seen anything like it. 

On our third day on the island we moved to stay at the dive resort Where Kelly was doing her open water course, big blue diving. We were rather lucky to arrive just before the big rains really started, but even by that point the streets around the dive centre was underwater (waist deep). On day two of the storm, we couldn’t really leave big blue. The road to the main town was totally underwater, with all storm drains and sewers completely full and overloading the streets, the bridge by us had collapsed, the beach was a total mess due to intense flooding washing everything away from scooters to statues of the King. First, the power went off, then food rations came into place(the kitchen ran out of everything and couldn’t get supplies in), then water ran out, then beer! Because all diving was off due to the storm, 150 slightly drunk and hungry divers were stuck with no food and nothing to do. At this point we decided to brave it and get supplies! This walk should have literally taken 5 minutes, but the flooding was so severe it took more like 30. After two days of non stop rain, the majority of this end of Koh Tao was Still at least knee deep under water, with stupidly strong currents making even a simple task like walking a dangerous and challenging task!

The island genuinely looked like a war zone, with shops and restaurants totally destroyed, buildings and walkways literally washing away. As more and more restaurants and shops either flooded or ran out of produce, you could feel a slight sense of panic across many peoples faces. See for yourself!

The rain continued for another 3 days, but not quite as severe. Kelly was actually able to get out and do her 3 days of diving, although from what she said, the conditions were sadly pretty dire! On the plus side, diving anywhere else will seem like paradise now! Over those 3 days she fully embraced her inner mermaid, going out 4 times on her open water course. She loved it so much she also ended up doing her advanced qualification, which included a 30m dive, a shipwreck dive and a night dive. Over the 4 and a half days of diving, she clocked up 9 dives to various sites around the island. I suspect this will be something she does for life now, and definitely a lot more on this year abroad! I also kept myself occupied by helping with the island clean up, and giving Crossfit a go, which i actually really enjoyed, but damn it’s a hardcore workout! Thanks to KTC for getting me up to speed and back to lifting heavy things again!


Now, time for a rant…

I’m writing this as I’m watching an episode of black mirror I think. Oh wait, this shit is REAL???? Yes, I’m obviously talking about Trump being elected….
The reason I’m even mentioning this, is because of his stance on climate makes my blood boil (to be honest his stance on everything does). Being stuck in freak weather like this really made me think about the impact climate change is having. I’ve always had an interest in sustainability and climate change and have been lucky to work with the Global Sustainability Institute at my university on a bunch of projects so have been fortunate to see some cutting edge research on the matter. I’ve also spent a fair amount of long bus rides watching and reading more about the impact were having. But Koh Tao was the first time I ever actually experienced a literal shit storm, and seen the massive impact climate change can have on societies. I am at a total loss that anyone can be a climate change denier, it’s bloody obvious we are destroying this planet, and fast.
AND THE USA HAS JUST ELECTED SOMEONE WHO DOESN’T BELIEVE IN THE IMPACT TO THE MOST POWERFUL JOB IN THE WORLD!!!!
I mean seriously, this is actually Black Mirror isn’t it?
I’ve found this whole election both fascinating and terrifying. Terrifying for so many reasons though. Like so many people, I’m at a complete loss as to how such a total fuckwit like Trump can become president, but add on top of that the scandals with Russia, basically every thing he’s ever put on Twitter, every other scandal that comes out during this time, and the fact Clinton actually got more votes and still didn’t win makes me question the the legitimacy of the whole electoral system in the states (as well as the sanity of huge waves of the USA populous). The real problem for me though, is how widespread the impact of Trump is going to be. Trump has basically said he wants to ramp up the use of fossil fuels to make America great again, but this will impact us all, for a country that’s already one of the biggest contributors to greenhouse emissions and generally cocking up our planet, this is not cool! I honestly have no idea how anyone can actually deny climate change…


Seeing all this first hand is honestly terrifying, and unless we do something to combat this change, you’ll all be experiencing similar at some point I’m sure. I would encourage you to watch two documentaries, Al Gores “an inconvenient truth” and Leo De Caprio’s “before the flood” that both do fantastic jobs at showing the real world impacts we are enduring. Being stuck on Koh Tao during such a terrifying storm really bought climate change to life for me, and it’s something I’ll never forget. We all need to do our bits to fight our self inflicted impending doom, before we see some truly disastrous changes happening to our world. I just hope Trump can’t fuck things up too much for us all..

ANYWAY…

So I’ve pretty much described the 5 or so days of Armageddon that we experienced, but after the storm, it was like being on a different island. It was quite incredible seeing how quickly the island recovered to be honest. Within a few days the water had nearly all subsided, the countless rubbish pick up missions had tidied the areas, and building had started to repair the really badly damaged areas. When the sun came out, I honestly could have cried, and when the beaches were good enough to lie on, I was utterly overjoyed. We were lucky to catch up with Matt and Charlie (who shall be known forevermore as the beautiful people), a couple we met in Varanasi who are both dive masters thanks to Big Blue, so enjoyed the good weather with them on a couple of days and evenings, but we basically reverted back to being proper sun worshippers for the next five days, driving around the island hunting out the best beaches (and sneaking into private resorts to borrow a bit of VIP experience for a day). When Koh Tao isn’t being clobbered by a typhoon, it really is bloody beautiful! I can definitely see why it’s such a popular place to visit, even if you take diving out of the equation. Sadly for health reasons I’ve been told I can NEVER dive, but I still manage to have a great time. We ended up staying for ten days in the end, the longest we’ve stayed anywhere on this trip, and after ten days we really didn’t want to leave! Big thanks to the Big Blue staff for being awesome, and especially to Alex for being a superb diving instructor, also thanks to Gaz at KTC for introducing me to Crossfit, something I’ve wanted to try for ages.

Pai and Bangkok- it’s not all glitter and rainbows!

I’ve had a few comments from people on this blog and other forms of social media that we are absolutely living the dream on this trip. In the main this is absolutely true. We’ve done things we’d never have dreamed of, and experienced things I’d never have expected to see, but it’s not all fun and games. The 14 hour bus journeys, unexpected things that occur,constant hassle from touts and taxi drivers, illness, trying to find a hostel at 4am after barely sleeping a wink all night, and spending an hour looking for a place to eat that’s just that little bit cheaper than the last. These are all trivial issues I realise, but after a while the build up can be incredibly monotonous.

Then there’s the situation we landed ourselves in recently, where being meticulously organised months back came to bite us in the arse. I call this place Pai.
After an unforgettable time in Chiang Mai and surrounding jungles we decided we needed to go see Pai; it’s somewhere literally everyone who has been said you have to go, so we went for it. The notorious journey to Pai spans about 180km from Chiang Mai but contains about 760 sharp turns around mountainous roads, where coming face to face with a Lorry on the wrong side of the road is commonplace. It notorious for giving those with the most iron of guts some pretty hardcore travel sickness, and certainly succeeded for the Chinese ladies sat next to us! 

We decided to book into Circus hostel which is literally as it sounds; a hostel that is pretty much a circus! This place had some of the most beautiful views I saw in Pai, overlooking the main town and surrounding mountains, with an infinity pool on the crest of the hill, and hundreds of circus goodies to try your hand at. I made most use of the slack line with a bit of juggling in between to keep me entertained. We were staying in another very simple bamboo hut which totally did the job, I’m actually thinking I’m going to need to build one when back on English soil purely for nostalgic reasons! After a quick play around with the Goodies at the hostel we ventured into the town to explore the famous night market. Similar to Chiang Mai, this was a unique market not selling quite as much crap as were used to selling, but this market took over the WHOLE town! We probably spent three hours exploring what was going on! That evening I enjoyed some awesome fire acts from the longer staying residents of the hostel. I didn’t even know you could do fire rings!!The following day we went to explore the outer parts of Pai in the more rural areas, when we really fell in love with the place. The whole atmosphere in Pai is so relaxed and friendly, we just wanted to stay longer, not to mention its surrounded by absolutely gorgeous landscapes! 


This is where planning in advance really stung us. We had booked our transport to Bangkok and booked a hotel well in advance to avoid being caught out over New Years. After two days in Pai we decided we wanted to spend a week there, including over New Years. However upon investigation we realised we couldn’t reorganise our bus without effectively voiding the tickets, and couldn’t cancel the hotel without incurring a charge. In total, we would have lost about £80, an expense we simply couldn’t afford or justify sadly. So with that, we waved goodbye to Pai after just two days, we got back on the bus to Chiang Mai, and got a sleeper VIP bus to Bangkok. 

First thing to say here is Thai VIP buses aren’t so VIP…. You spend about 12 hours trying to find legroom in front of your quasi reclined seat; the lights come on at random times throughout the night, and you’ll stop for dinner at around 1.30am. Lovely stuff! Just be aware there is no vip to this trip! If you want a bed, make use of trains!

When we arrived in Bangkok we stayed a ten minute walk from the famous Khaosan road, a notorious backpacker road filled with street food, bars having decibel wars all night long, ladyboys and forceful touts pushing you to go to a ping pong show. After reading other blog posts about the dark side of the sex tourism industry in Thailand this didn’t really appeal to us at all, and to our surprise we barely saw any evidence of these shows anywhere: maybe the tides are turning, or maybe we just weren’t looking hard enough (if at all). 

Either way, we spent NYE on Khaosan road and surrounding areas, which was crazy to say the least! Tens of thousands of people roamed the streets looking for a party. We didn’t even go into a bar that night because it was so busy on the roads we didn’t need to! It was cool being there, but not the NYE I would have liked in Thailand really. Man I wish we could have stayed in Pai!

The next few days were spent exploring Bangkok, but again were unsuccessful in the main, apart from exploring the famous temples which were very cool! Apart from this,  the city was a total ghost town! I’m not sure if over here things just stay closed longer (like until the 3/4th jan after the new year celebrations) but we literally walked one day for 5k to see nothing open;very surreal. The whole of Thailand is still in mourning for the King too, and I suspect this too had a part to play in the slightly toned down celebrations (including no fireworks in the capital)! We didn’t know this but the king was actually lying in state whilst we were there. We saw tens of thousands of people queueing for hours to pay their respects all wearing black; a very surreal experience. 

I appreciate this is a fairly dull and miserable post so far. We did actually enjoy ourselves in Bangkok! The NYE celebrations may not have been what we hoped for but we still had a great night, and seeing the temples around the palace areas of the city were very impressive; it’s just a shame we couldn’t have stayed in Pai. You live and learn I guess. 

The unexpected continues sadly. I’m currently writing this from Koh Tao island, south of Bangkok and on the East coast of Thailand. It’s a beautiful island known for stunning beaches and some pretty amazing diving! Sadly since the moment we arrived the island has been battered by one hell of a storm that’s destroyed the island! I’ll write another post about this later in the week, but here’s a sneak peak of what we’ve endured here. 


So again, I appreciate this all probably seems trivial in contrast to normal life, but it’s not all shiny happy fun times whilst backpacking. Still, better than working I’m sure!

Chiang Mai- A very different Xmas

We’ve had a very weird bunch of emotions seeing you all gearing up for xmas around the world. Normally the routine is the same year in year out; go buy a tree, spend a day decorating the house, work xmas parties, getting the family together for a massive gorge on wonderful over indulgent grub followed by a food coma, maybe a few very lavish drinks (maybe even too many of these) and the mandatory dog walk around the village. For me and many of you I’m sure, xmas is all about the family and spending quality time together. Both mine and Kelly’s family live overseas and She’s not spent xmas with all her family for six years now, and because we were planning this trip we couldn’t afford to travel to the Emirates to see my family last year, so spent it at home in Essex together with her brother and partner (who were travelling Europe and happened to be in the UK at the time). It was really nice to take charge on all the xmas preparation, but it’s just not the same without all the family together.

This year though, we spent Xmas in Chiang Mai, a northern Thailand city, surrounded by glorious mountain ranges. We actually arrived in Thailand on the 19th, following a rather touch and go transfer from Siem reap to Bangkok and a flight to Chiang Mai that we ended up nearly missing due to the visa check. We both agreed at the start of our planning that we needed to do some epic things around Xmas to keep our minds off being away from family and that we did! 

We started our time in Chiang Mai with a very chilled out couple of days, getting the lay of the land of the small city and he central old quarter, starting off with visiting the Sunday night market. Now if you’ve been anywhere in South East Asia, you’ll think you’ve seen markets; they are all pretty similar. The standard wall to wall stalls selling beer singlets, coconut bowls, street food to satisfy the masses, and everyone offering a “special price only for you” on everything. I’ve got to say though, this market was really different. We didn’t get hassled once to buy anything, the stuff covering the streets really seemed to be locally produced and good quality, even the clothing, which had a traditional Karen influence (Karen people aren’t Thai, but live in the mountains off the standard grid of main Thailand). The food obviously is amazing. Cambodian cuisine really bored me to be honest, and tasted like dull Thai influenced food with no chilli, but this street food really smacked in the face of Thai spicy (not something to be messed with)! Because were travelling for so long we seldom buy anything, but experiencing the markets is an important part of the places were visiting, so has to be done!

The next day we took a walking tour by ourselves of the temples. There are literally hundreds of them! Thailand is 95% Buddhist so they do temples in a big way. I know it sounds awful, but after two days exploring the Angkor temples we felt somewhat underwhelmed. I don’t want to do a disservice to the the beauty of these temples but after that it’s tough to appreciate them in all their glory. Still, worth seeing them. Kelly learned to make bracelets and necklaces whilst on the island in Cambodia and really wanted to make stuff on this trip, so we spent the afternoon exploring the haberdasher markets for materials, followed by a tour of the artistic markets. I must say, the artwork we saw being produce was truly stunning; if we can, I’ll definitely be coming back here just to stock up on art (once were proper grown ups and own our own house obviously)! That evening, we discovered a quality street food market that reminded me of the street feast setups in London (but with much better food). This was a great place to spend the evening; embracing the local cuisine but delivered to a higher standard than that you simply find on the streets or small cafes and restaurants. To top it off, there are loads of really excellent musicians playing covers of western artists, which were top quality. If you’re in Chiang Mai at any point, I really recommend visiting the Ploen Ruedee Night Market.

To really kick off the days running up to xmas day, we totally filled our days with fun: Had to be done really

Cookery school

I love to cook, and I really love to cook Asian food. I’ve been reluctant to do cookery classes so far on our trip because to be honest, they’ve been really generic. I do not want to pay to be shown how to make bloody spring rolls! Thailand was always going to be the place where we did a class. We decided to book onto a course with Basil cookery school. There are again hundreds of cookery schools in Chiang Mai, but this was a great price, and included a great array of dishes to please any foodie! Our coach, Pim, was so bubbly and had a cracking wit and sense of humour. To top this off she could COOK!

We started the day buying our produce from a local market then spent the day cooking everything from curry to pad Thai, stir fries to salads. Kelly and I strategically planned our dishes so she did the stuff we love to cook, and I focussed on the new stuff that was mainly seafood. It was all so good and was some of he best food I’ve made of this style. I’ll definitely be making my own coconut milk from now on!

Jungle trekking around Chiang Mai 

Before we set off to India, we agreed we wanted to do a jungle trek. We found an eco tour run by Pooh Eco Tours that sounded right up our street, so booked on about nine months ago. I am so glad we did!

We spent 3 days with 6 others and our guide Ropuu. Day one started with a ride in the back of a Hilux to our starting point, followed by a trek around some of the most beautiful landscapes I’ve ever seen. Ropuu, a traditional Karen tribesman who moved to Chiang Mai to earn some cash, was absolutely fantastic at showing us all the traditional, weird and wonderful things you find in the jungle, including what they eat (basically anything that moves). Now I’m all for trying new things, but when he started munching baby spiders after he shoved his hand in a nest was one step too far for me. Day one ended with an epic hike up a mountain to arrive at the Karen village we’d be staying at.

We spent the night with the villagers, preparing a wonderful dinner made up of local produce and the herbs we had foraged on route. Perhaps the best part of the night though was the sky. I’ve never seen the moon or stars so clearly; words really can’t describe how clear it was and how mesmerised we all were. Regardless of this, we were all in bed by 9pm ahead of a hectic second day.

Day 2 started early thanks to the rooster under our hut deciding we had to wake at 330am, (at least we got to see the sunrise I guess) but was followed by a wicked breakfast and with even more beautiful landscapes, followed by some pretty treacherous declines for about two hours. We were jointed by a few of the tribesmen, and the cutest little puppy, who stayed with us for the next two days (Kelly was very happy about this). Climbing up a mountain is tough, but climbing down through the jungle is arguably more difficult! Like our hike in Kep, really were many points I thought if we slipped, we’d have a real problem. Fortunately the tribesmen who joined us made us all bamboo walking sticks which literally saved us! After about 4 hours we finally reached the bottom alongside a lovely waterfall, which we obviously took full advantage of! An hour later trekking through the river, we reached our stop for the night, a bamboo hut. We spent the next two hours making plates, cutlery, and cups out of locally cut bamboo, and prepping another cracking dinner of yellow curry, sweet and sour veg and bamboo steamed rice. This was amazing for me, as everything we made ourselves and cooked in bamboo. It will never cease to amaze me how much you can do with bamboo, it’s such a versatile natural resource in total abundance in Thailand!

Our final day was again, stunning landscapes galore! The first two hours involved crossing rivers, climbing up waterfalls, through caves lit only by bamboo torches, rice paddies and land used for raising cattle. We finished the day with a seriously epic climb up another mountain that was seriously tough! Kelly was a machine, especially considering she was ill for the whole trip! Over the 3 days we trekked for 13 hours, 15 miles, 1km up and about 900m down. It was bloody difficult, but my god was it amazing! 

Seriously, I can’t recommend this tour group higher. We had an unforgettable three days and because of the group size it was such a good price!

Xmas day with elephants

When you come to Thailand, you’ll see thousands of elephant tours. We did loads of research into a tour, because so many mistreat the elephants. Contrary to the believes of many, riding elephants is not good! DO NOT DO IT! Elephants are not built to withhold weight on their spines, and this does serious damage. Also the process for training elephants to do such things is known as “the crush” involves some horrendous activity literally designed to break their spirit. If you want to learn more watch this video (trigger warning, it’s not nice). So many places that offer rides keep the elephants chained as well as generally treating them badly, we were determined to avoid this at all costs!

We booked with elephant jungle sanctuary, a group who only run eithical days with elephants. There’s no riding them, painting them (yep, this is a thing) or anything that causes these fabulous animals distress, you literally feed them, bath them, feed them some more and just enjoy being with them. I later found out that these elephants actually roam the jungles, and just know to come for food around 10am. Whilst this domestication isn’t perfect I appreciate, only 20% of the elephants in south east Asia are truly wild; a shocking statistic!

Wow though, these guys were incredible. I know they are big but when you’re right next to them they are so much bigger than I appreciated, even the babies! I unfortunately had a close call with one when it decided to charge at me as I was the only person in the mud bath. Obviously this wasn’t the animal being mean, but wanting to play, but it was a close call, and bloody scary! Again, I really recommend doing something like this. It’s not the cheapest day, but feeding these guys costs $20 a day EACH so I had no issue paying for this day. Yet again, something I’ll never forget.

Xmas day in the sun

We were really fortunate to meet some quality people at our hostel who we immediately gelled with, so went out for a traditional Xmas lunch of curry on Xmas day. I think it’s safe to say our 2am finish the night before meant we were all quite happy to have a slower day than usual! Whilst spending part of the day with these awesome people was great, and I’m so grateful to meet them, it’s not the same. We definitely didn’t feel like it was Christmas. 

However, in traditional (or nor ) Xmas fashion, Kelly and I went to get inked! I’ve always loved tattoos, especially when done well. This trip has shown me how beautiful some tattoos can be, so I decided I wanted one for sure! My family and I have talked about a family tattoo for ages, so this had to symbolise something about them, but I also wanted something about my game changing time in Asia, and to symbolise travel.

Kelly got two, cause you know, she’s greedy and stuff. One like me was to symbolise family and our time in Asia, but the other is to symbolise life. She’s had a disgustingly tough few years, with family death all over the globe, family emigration and general separation, a pretty nasty car crash and a bunch of other things.and this symbolises a new chapter of NO WORRIES! Also if you know her, she’s a Disney obsessive, so it had to be Disney related really.

So as you can see, a pretty average and generic Christmas for us! All jokes aside, this is not one we will forget soon! We’re now in Pai, north of Chiang Mai, to have a few days embracing our inner hippie. Sadly due to the new ink we can’t make the most of our infinity pool overlooking the mountains, but it’s a very cool place none the less. We’re literally staying at a circus with some seriously talented people. I’m working on my slack line.